The Best Way to Clean a Mullet Gizzard

Gizzard Small

Mullet are one of the few species of fish that have gizzards (just like chickens.) The gizzard is a little tougher than the rest of the fish, but if you clean them like this, you’ll find they’re tender and tasty when fried.

To get the gizzard, go ahead and make your first cut, reach inside and feel for a hard, round muscle and pull it out. Wash off the outside, but there’s no need to clean it out because this method leaves the middle intact so it can be discarded. You’ll be left with just a strip of good, clean meat.

CLICK ON THE PICTURE TO SEE THE VIDEO

Thanks to my brother, Steve McClellan, for the demonstration.

 

 

 

 

 

4 Responses to The Best Way to Clean a Mullet Gizzard

  1. Kent Koptiuch says:

    Gosh Jim, is the gizzard that much better than the rest of the mullet? Seems like a lot of extra work for just a mouthful!

    Growing up, I often wondered what made my Ukranian grandmother spend so much time preparing chicken gizzards and hearts, pickled pigs feet, kielbasa, and various head cheese products; they were always delicious once you got past their origins, but why go to the trouble when the other parts of the chicken or hog were so easy to prepare and just as tasty (if not more).

    Later, I grew to realize that peasant folk like my grandmother had to make do with whatever was left after the overlords made off with the prime cuts. Which leads me back to the mullet …just what are the prime cuts and who made off with them?

    • JimMcClellan says:

      Haha! I think the gizzard is best compared to a scallop, at least in terms of taste vs. difficulty to harvest and clean. It really only takes a second to pull them out and peel. If you have a bunch of them, you can use them as an appetizer to give folks a taste of fish before you’re done frying the fillets. If you notice in the video, the mullet were also full of roe, which my brother likes — and I routinely toss.

  2. The Reverend Fowl ™ says:

    We have gotten these in Georgia with seines and cast nets.
    I remember running into those tiny porpoises too.

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